Supporting people in Northern Cameroon displaced by conflict

Humanitarian and development assistance for internally displaced persons, refugees, returnees and host communities in the Far North of Cameroon
Jobs & Livelihoods

Supporting people in Northern Cameroon displaced by conflict

Humanitarian and development assistance for internally displaced persons, refugees, returnees and host communities in the Far North of Cameroon

The project in brief

Implemented by

United Nations Development Program UNDP and United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees UNHCR - Cameroon

Country

Cameroon

Duration

March 2018 - March 2019

Description

The Boko Haram insurgency has impacted Cameroon, with around 116,000 Nigerian refugees and over 321,000 internally displaced persons (IDPs) in the north of the country. They lack access to health, education and water, and livelihood activities are limited. The large number of people creates tension with the host community. 

UNDP and UNHCR are working to strengthen peace, with a strong focus on social cohesion, aid kits and shelter, youth job creation, two mediation structures and the involvement of young people in peacebuilding. 

Project aims

Strengthen peace and build stability by supporting integration in areas that host refugees and IDPs. This includes the improvement of overall living conditions, the promotion of social cohesion and conflict resolutions mechanisms, and the provision of livelihood support. 

Resources used

A strong technical expertise of the Japanese government was utilized for the livelihood component. 

The project is part of Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP) 2018 and also contributes to Regional Refugee Response Plan (RRRP Nigeria). 

Main activities of the Good Practice

UNDP and UNHCR conducted joint monitoring missions to assure coherent approaches. While UNHCR offered humanitarian assistance and respond to immediate needs, UNDP supported communities through sustainable activities.

Activities included: cash for work activities, distribution of humanitarian kits, shelter construction and community mediation. UNDP has also established water point management committees, some of whom are out-of-camp refugees and IDPs are members. 

Partners

  • Local CSO (Public Concern)
  • Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) 

Results of the Good Practice 

  • 255 young people have benefited from job opportunities such as dressmaking, small scaled business animal husbandry, food processing, carpentering, storage and catering. 
  • Two functioning mechanisms for mediation and peacebuilding (traditional chiefdoms and local dispute resolution boards) in two communities. 
  • 20 percent of youth in the two communities have participated in dispute resolution, confidence-building and community dialogue activities
  • 1,323 households were settled in the three communities after reception of humanitarian kit 
  • 404 shelters were constructed. 

“We arrived here after several attacks on our village by the Boko Haram. We cannot thank the community enough for the sacrifices they made for us and the land they’ve given,” said Adjida Fauzia, displaced after raids on her village.  

“We have grown together. We farmed rice together successfully through a Ministry project. We had a lot of hope for the rice, sorghum and millet, but floods have washed everything away apart from the rice. The UNDP and UNHCR construction of a borehole in the village will help”. 

How the project meets the GCR Objectives

Objective 1: Ease the pressures on host countries

The development, peacebuilding and humanitarian components benefit host and displaced communities, reducing pressure on both. 

Objective 2: Enhance refugee self-reliance

Increased livelihood opportunities for displaced populations increase self-reliance.  

Next steps&

The collaboration and coordination will continue with information exchange and joint missions, in particular in the field of the Far North region.